News

Mon, 20/09/2021
Register now: 1st Symposium inflammation and imaging
When?: from November 2nd to November 4th 2021 Where?: Schloss (seat of the University Administration) Muenster Organizers: Co-operative Research Centres 1009, 1450, Transregio 128, and Clinical Research Unit 342 – together with Interdisciplinary Centre of Clinical Research (IZKF) and Excellence Cluster Cells in Motion (CiM) Registration is open now! More information: here...more
Mon, 09/08/2021
Dietary conjugated linoleic acid links reduced intestinal inflammation to amelioration of CNS autoimmunity
A close interaction between gut immune responses and distant organ-specific autoimmunity including the CNS in multiple sclerosis has been established in recent years. This so-called gut-CNS axis can be shaped by dietary factors, either directly or via indirect modulation of the gut microbiome and its metabolites. Here, SFB 128 PI Luisa Klotz and colleagues report […]...more
Thu, 28/01/2021
BioNTech Publishes Data on Novel mRNA Vaccine Approach to Treat Autoimmune Diseases in Science
BioNTech SE (Nasdaq: BNTX, “BioNTech” or “the Company”) announced the publication of preclinical data on its novel mRNA vaccine approach against autoimmune diseases in the peer-reviewed journal Science. The publication titled “A non-inflammatory mRNA vaccine for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis” co-authored by SFB principal investigator Ari Waisman summarizes the findings on the disease-suppressing effects […]...more


Thu, 09/11/2017 | Elisabeth Schuh received SEED funding

Munich. SFB 128 researcher Elisabeth Schuh, MD, has been honoured by a young scientist’s studentship within the KKNMS SEED program. In her project „The role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis“, Dr. Schuh analyses the influence of the NLRP3in MS. NLRP is a cytosolic protein complex in monocytes, macrophages and neutrophil granolucytes that regulated the production of inflammatory cytokines of the interleukin-1 family. In her project, Dr. Schuh wants to identify the population of myeloid cells involved in MS pathogenesis, with the aim of finding new pathways for therapeutic intervention that prevent autoimmune tissue damage.
The SEED program addresses scientists younger than 32 years who have not yet completed their medical training. The maximum funding is 32.000 € or 75 percent of the project’s budget. The remaining 25% have to be paid by the stipend’s employee.