News

Mon, 27/01/2020
Featured Publication: Integrated single cell analysis of blood and cerebrospinal fluid leukocytes in multiple sclerosis
Münster. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protects the central nervous system (CNS) and analyzing CSF aids the diagnosis of CNS diseases, but our understanding of CSF leukocytes remains superficial. Here, using single cell transcriptomics, SFB researchers identify a specific border-associated composition and transcriptome of CSF leukocytes. In an article published in Nature Communications, they show that multiple […]...more
Tue, 14/01/2020
Immunology-Seminar: Prof. Dr. Britta Engelhardt: The brain barriers maintain CNS immune privilege
Mainz. The SFB 128 is happy welcome Prof. Dr. Britta Engelhardt from Theo Kocher Institute Bern as lecturer at the Mainz Immunology Seminar. Time: Thursday, January 30, 5:00 p.m. Place: Building 308 A, Room 3.105, 3rd floor, University Medical Center Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz...more
Tue, 22/10/2019
The key lies in cell metabolism: Neuroscientist and neurologist Luisa Klotz wins renowned Heinrich-Pette-Award
Münster. For the third time the renowned neuroscience award “Heinrich Pette prize” goes to Münster, as this year Luisa Klotz was rewarded with the prestigious award for neuroscience researchers and clinicians at the congress of the German Society of Neurology in Stuttgart. Neurologist and Neuroscientist Luisa Klotz received the award for her outstanding research in […]...more


Thu, 09/11/2017 | Elisabeth Schuh received SEED funding

Munich. SFB 128 researcher Elisabeth Schuh, MD, has been honoured by a young scientist’s studentship within the KKNMS SEED program. In her project „The role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis“, Dr. Schuh analyses the influence of the NLRP3in MS. NLRP is a cytosolic protein complex in monocytes, macrophages and neutrophil granolucytes that regulated the production of inflammatory cytokines of the interleukin-1 family. In her project, Dr. Schuh wants to identify the population of myeloid cells involved in MS pathogenesis, with the aim of finding new pathways for therapeutic intervention that prevent autoimmune tissue damage.
The SEED program addresses scientists younger than 32 years who have not yet completed their medical training. The maximum funding is 32.000 € or 75 percent of the project’s budget. The remaining 25% have to be paid by the stipend’s employee.