Projects

Project area A focuses on the elucidation of innate and adaptive mechanisms related to the etiology, onset and course of chronic neuroinflammation.

While projects A1-A3 study principal processes of the immune response, projects A4-A6 mainly investigate the initiating (or perpetuating) adaptive immune factors in the disease, and A7-A9 focus on the balance of different adaptive immune responses. Important intracellular functions (A3) as well as antigen recognition (A4-A6) and differentiation or shaping of relevant pro-inflammatory or regulatory lymphocyte subpopulations (A7-A9) are in the center of these projects. Developing the human immune system, in particular the role of lymphocytes, in rodents (A9) will enable us to better achieve our goal of clinical translation.

To learn more about the individual projects, please visit the Project area A page.

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Project Area B addresses significant processes related to transmigration and infiltration of immune cells into the CNS as well as lesion development, lesion resolution and the impact for the overall functional outcome. These approaches often combine molecular and cellular mechanisms with innovative imaging tools, both in rodent experimental systems and in humans.

Projects B1-B3 investigate the routes of the immune cells and the involved processes at and beyond the blood brain barrier. From there project B4 goes on to the perivascular space and studies antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their capacity to shape the T cell response within the CNS. Project B5 and B6 study an inflammatory lesion and its impact on neuronal network and functional outcome. While project B5 examines this part of the pathology in patients with Multiple Sclerosis using a combination of imaging and advanced electrophysiology, project B6 investigates it in brain slices and rodent models. Projects B7 and B8 study processes of de- and remyelination, also analyzing underlying causes for demyelinated and remyelinated lesions in patients. Processes of neuronal injury as well as the regenerative capacity in the neuronal compartment are investigated in the projects B9 and B10.

To learn more about the individual projects, please visit the Project area B page.

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Project Area Z consists of central service projects that support the research projects in Areas A and B. These projects provide platforms through which samples are collected, stored and analyzed using standardized procedures to ensure consistency and access to samples across all sites.

To learn more about the individual projects, please visit the Project area Z page.

News

Mon, 14/08/2017
Renowned AIDS researcher presents his work
Mainz. HIV-1, the major causative agent of AIDS, has infected more than 60 million people and caused around 20 million deaths worldwide (WHO report 2009). Prof. Frank Kirchhoff, director of the Institute of Molecular Virology, Ulm, is one of Germany’s most recognized scientists investigating HIV-1. Kirchoff has been honoured by numerous awards – among them […]...more
Thu, 06/07/2017
From bistability to complexity in the cortical network
Mainz. SFB-PI Albrecht Stroh is proud to welcome Prof. María Sanches Vives from the Institut d’Investigacions Biomediques in Barcelona as a guest lecturer within the FTN seminar series 2017. Prof. Sanches Vives is ICREA Research Professor at the IDIBAPS (Institut d’Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer) in Barcelona since 2008, where she is the head […]...more
Thu, 22/06/2017
CSF diagnostics in neurodegenerative diseases
Munich. Prof. Markus Otto from the Department of Neurology Ulm is invited speaker at the neurocolloquium Munich. Prof. Otto is head of the scientific working group on neurochemistry and neurodegeneration at Ulm University and expert on neurochemical diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease (14-3-3, Tau-protein, Abeta-Peptides, S-100B, H-FABP, alpha synuclein) as well as head of a sample […]...more