Projects

Project area A focuses on the elucidation of innate and adaptive mechanisms related to the etiology, onset and course of chronic neuroinflammation.

While projects A1-A3 study principal processes of the immune response, projects A4-A6 mainly investigate the initiating (or perpetuating) adaptive immune factors in the disease, and A7-A9 focus on the balance of different adaptive immune responses. Important intracellular functions (A3) as well as antigen recognition (A4-A6) and differentiation or shaping of relevant pro-inflammatory or regulatory lymphocyte subpopulations (A7-A9) are in the center of these projects. Developing the human immune system, in particular the role of lymphocytes, in rodents (A9) will enable us to better achieve our goal of clinical translation.

To learn more about the individual projects, please visit the Project area A page.

Logo-SFB_Bilder-Projects-bilder_1

Project Area B addresses significant processes related to transmigration and infiltration of immune cells into the CNS as well as lesion development, lesion resolution and the impact for the overall functional outcome. These approaches often combine molecular and cellular mechanisms with innovative imaging tools, both in rodent experimental systems and in humans.

Projects B1-B3 investigate the routes of the immune cells and the involved processes at and beyond the blood brain barrier. From there project B4 goes on to the perivascular space and studies antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their capacity to shape the T cell response within the CNS. Project B5 and B6 study an inflammatory lesion and its impact on neuronal network and functional outcome. While project B5 examines this part of the pathology in patients with Multiple Sclerosis using a combination of imaging and advanced electrophysiology, project B6 investigates it in brain slices and rodent models. Projects B7 and B8 study processes of de- and remyelination, also analyzing underlying causes for demyelinated and remyelinated lesions in patients. Processes of neuronal injury as well as the regenerative capacity in the neuronal compartment are investigated in the projects B9 and B10.

To learn more about the individual projects, please visit the Project area B page.

Logo-SFB_Bilder-Projects-bilder_2

Project Area Z consists of central service projects that support the research projects in Areas A and B. These projects provide platforms through which samples are collected, stored and analyzed using standardized procedures to ensure consistency and access to samples across all sites.

To learn more about the individual projects, please visit the Project area Z page.

News

Tue, 17/10/2017
Three new CRC associates
Muenster / Mainz / Munich. The CRC is proud to welcome three scientists as new associates: Muthuraman Muthuraman (Mainz), Anneli Peters (LMU) and Gerd Meyer zu Hörste (Münster). All three are reputable neuroimmunologists, who add their in-depth knowledge of techniques and concepts to the existing team. Dr. Muthuraman Muthuraman is head of the scientific working group […]...more
Tue, 12/09/2017
Genetically altered mice provide initial evidence that human gut bacteria can trigger multiple sclerosis
Munich. (LMU)  Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. There are many indications that MS is an autoimmune disease in which immune cells “accidentally” attack the brain and spinal cord. However, as with other autoimmune diseases, the actual triggers of the autoimmune reaction are still unknown. A new […]...more
Sun, 10/09/2017
SFB researcher acquired Hertie foundation funding
Munich. SFB CRC 128 researcher Dr. Klaus Lehmann-Horn, Department of Neurology, has acquired 396.000€ of funding as part of the framework „MyLab“, which is sponsored by the Hertie foundation. The duration of the project „Antigen-driven affinity maturation of B lymphocytes in meningeal ectopic lymphoid tissue in a model of Multiple Sclerosis“ will be 5 years, […]...more