Projects

Project area A focuses on the elucidation of innate and adaptive mechanisms related to the etiology, onset and course of chronic neuroinflammation.

While projects A1-A3 study principal processes of the immune response, projects A4-A6 mainly investigate the initiating (or perpetuating) adaptive immune factors in the disease, and A7-A9 focus on the balance of different adaptive immune responses. Important intracellular functions (A3) as well as antigen recognition (A4-A6) and differentiation or shaping of relevant pro-inflammatory or regulatory lymphocyte subpopulations (A7-A9) are in the center of these projects. Developing the human immune system, in particular the role of lymphocytes, in rodents (A9) will enable us to better achieve our goal of clinical translation.

To learn more about the individual projects, please visit the Project area A page.

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Project Area B addresses significant processes related to transmigration and infiltration of immune cells into the CNS as well as lesion development, lesion resolution and the impact for the overall functional outcome. These approaches often combine molecular and cellular mechanisms with innovative imaging tools, both in rodent experimental systems and in humans.

Projects B1-B3 investigate the routes of the immune cells and the involved processes at and beyond the blood brain barrier. From there project B4 goes on to the perivascular space and studies antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their capacity to shape the T cell response within the CNS. Project B5 and B6 study an inflammatory lesion and its impact on neuronal network and functional outcome. While project B5 examines this part of the pathology in patients with Multiple Sclerosis using a combination of imaging and advanced electrophysiology, project B6 investigates it in brain slices and rodent models. Projects B7 and B8 study processes of de- and remyelination, also analyzing underlying causes for demyelinated and remyelinated lesions in patients. Processes of neuronal injury as well as the regenerative capacity in the neuronal compartment are investigated in the projects B9 and B10.

To learn more about the individual projects, please visit the Project area B page.

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Project Area Z consists of a Clinical Translation Unit. The overall aim of this platform is to support various translational aspects of the CRC128. In particular, we pursue the following approaches:

  • Provide a platform for „proof-of-concept“ clinical studies (association with project A08)
  • Present a translational platform for support of single scientific projects in order to strengthen their translational aspects (examples are A01, A08, A09, B03, B07)
  • Provide a service platform in terms of infrastructure as well as biomaterial collection for use in individual scientific projects (examples are A08, A09, A10, B01, B08)

Schematic presentation of assays and methods provided within the CTU

To learn more about the individual projects, please visit the Project area Z page.

News

Mon, 03/06/2019
Publication: Teriflunomide treatment for multiple sclerosis modulates T cell mitochondrial respiration with affinity-dependent effects.
Muenster. For the first time scientists from the University of Münster could show that multiple sclerosis (MS) alters the energy metabolism of T cells during acute phases of disease exacerbation. Therapeutic interventions targeting the metabolism of activated T cells display new potential avenues for treatment of patients with MS affecting around 250,000 people in Germany. The […]...more
Mon, 29/04/2019
Publication: Calcium influx through plasma-membrane nanoruptures drives axon degeneration in a model of multiple sclerosis.
Munich.  Here SFB researchers from Munich use in vivo calcium imaging in a multiple sclerosis model to show that cytoplasmic calcium levels determine the choice between axon loss and survival. Calcium can enter the axon through nanoscale ruptures of the axonal plasma membrane that are induced in inflammatory lesions. Neuron doi: 10.1016/ j.neuron.2018.12.023...more
Tue, 04/12/2018
SFB 128 International Symposium
SFB 128. We are happy to announce the international Symposium of the Collaborative Research Centre 128 “Multiple Sclerosis” taking place from Sunday, September 15th, till Tuesday, September 17th, 2019 in the Rhine Main region. Full details of the event will follow....more