Project Area A

Innate and adaptive immune mechanisms outside of the CNS

 

A01

The impact of nutrition and the gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and its therapeutic implications

PD Dr. Gurumoorthy Krishnamoorthy
MPI für Biochemie
Martinsried

Prof. Dr. Aiden Haghikia
Klinikum der Ruhr-Universität
Bochum

Prof. Dr. Ralf Gold
Klinikum der Ruhr-Universität
Bochum

 

A03

G-protein-coupled receptor signaling in immune cells and endothelial cells: implications for neuroinflammation

Prof. Dr. Nina Wettschureck
Institut für Molekulare Medizin / MPI für Herz- und Lungenforschung
Frankfurt / Bad Nauheim

Prof. Dr. Ari Waisman
Institut für Molekulare Medizin
Mainz

 

A04

Tissue specific regulation of ion channels and immunological responses in multiple sclerosis

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Hemmer
Klinik für Neurologie
TU München

Dr. Klaus Lehmann-Horn
Klinik für Neurologie
TU München

 

A05

Synoptic analysis of adaptive immune reactions in very early multiple sclerosis: Repertoires and target antigens of B and T cells

PD Dr. Klaus Dornmair
Institut für Klinische Neuroimmunologie
LMU München

Prof. Dr. Reinhard Hohlfeld
Institut für Klinische Neuroimmunologie
LMU München

 

A07

A novel IL-6 signaling modality in the direct interaction of immune cells

Prof. Dr. Ari Waisman
Institut für Molekulare Medizin
Mainz

Prof. Dr. Thomas Korn
Neurologische Klinik
TU München

 

A08

Impact of dietary factors on the gut-CNS-axis – implications for CNS autoimmunity

Prof. Dr. Luisa Klotz
Klinik für Neurologie mit Institut für Translationale Neurologie
Münster

Prof. Dr. Dr. Detlef Schuppan
Institut für Translationale Immunologie
Mainz

 

A09

Analysis and therapeutic modification of innate immune regulatory networks controlling T cell responses in multiple sclerosis

Prof. Prof. h.c. Dr. Heinz Wiendl
Klinik für Neurologie mit Institut für Translationale Neurologie
Münster

Dr. Catharina Groß
Klinik für Neurologie mit Institut für Translationale Neurologie
Münster

 

A10

Skin-sensing of environmental factors and ther impact on the development of multiple sclerosis

Prof. Prof. h.c. Dr. Heinz Wiendl
Klinik für Neurologie mit Institut für Translationale Neurologie
Münster

Prof. Dr. Karin Loser
Klinik für Dermatologie
Münster

News

Mon, 09/03/2020
Breakthrough: SFB scientsists explain pathomechanism of Susac Syndrome
Münster. Neuroinflammation is often associated with blood-brain-barrier dysfunction, which contributes to neurological tissue damage. In a paper published in the renowned journal Nature Communications SFB 128 scientists from Mueenster reveal the pathophysiology of Susac syndrome (SuS), an enigmatic neuroinflammatory disease with central nervous system (CNS) endotheliopathy. By investigating immune cells from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, […]...more
Wed, 04/03/2020
The brain is less immune-priviledged than we thought
Münster. Although the CNS is immune privileged, continuous search for pathogens and tumours by immune cells within the CNS is indispensable. Thus, distinct immune-cell populations also cross the blood–brain barrier independently of inflammation/under homeostatic conditions. It was previously shown that effector memory T cells populate healthy CNS parenchyma in humans and, independently, that CCR5-expressing lymphocytes […]...more
Mon, 27/01/2020
Featured Publication: Integrated single cell analysis of blood and cerebrospinal fluid leukocytes in multiple sclerosis
Münster. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protects the central nervous system (CNS) and analyzing CSF aids the diagnosis of CNS diseases, but our understanding of CSF leukocytes remains superficial. Here, using single cell transcriptomics, SFB researchers identify a specific border-associated composition and transcriptome of CSF leukocytes. In an article published in Nature Communications, they show that multiple […]...more