News

Tue, 04/12/2018
SFB 128 International Symposium
SFB 128. We are happy to announce the international Symposium of the Collaborative Research Centre 128 “Multiple Sclerosis” taking place from Sunday, September 15th, till Tuesday, September 17th, 2019 in the Rhine Main region. Full details of the event will follow....more
Fri, 26/10/2018
Featured publication: Low-Frequency and Rare-Coding Variation Contributes to Multiple Sclerosis Risk
In a large multi-cohort study, performed by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium (IMSGC) and published in Cell Magazine, unexplained heritability for multiple sclerosis (MS) is detected in low-frequency coding variants that are missed by genome-wide association study (GWAS) analyses, further underscoring the role of immune genes in MS pathology. The IMSGC was formed in […]...more
Tue, 09/10/2018
Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy) will be funded
Munich. The Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy) by LMU and TUM will receive funding from 2019 on. Currently SFB PIs Prof. Reinhard Hohlfeld, Prof. Martin Kerschensteiner, Prof. Mikael Simons are also PIs of SyNergy projects....more


Thu, 16/03/2017 | SFB Scientists reprogram skin cells to brain cells to facilitate neurological research

SFB scientists Prof. Tanja Kuhlmann und Dr. Marc Ehrlich generate oligodendrocytes from skin cells (photo: FZ/E. Deiters-Keul)

Münster. (mfm/jr) Whether it be math, writing, reading or learning a new language: brain cells give us astonishing brainpower every day. When these cells are damaged by neurological diseases, cells cannot be simply sampled and analyzed in a petri dish. Scientists from the University of Münster and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine developed a new protocol to generate their brain cells of interest, oligodendrocytes, from skin. The team in Münster belongs to the few labs worldwide that have established this technique successfully in their lab; however the team in Münster can do this now much faster and more efficiently – with significant benefit for research. More .  . .