Muenster. For the first time scientists from the University of Münster could show that multiple sclerosis (MS) alters the energy metabolism of T cells during acute phases of disease exacerbation. Therapeutic interventions targeting the metabolism of activated T cells display new potential avenues for treatment of patients with MS affecting around 250,000 people in Germany. The results of the study have recently been published in the renowned journal Science Translational Medicine. In a clinical trial, the authors investigated the effects of the MS drug teriflunomide in patients and analyzed its effects on immune cells. They could reveal that the drug specifically interferes with the energy metabolism of T cells and thereby preferentially affects highly active immune cells. “The drug specifically interferes with the activation of these cells already in the early initiation phase”, explains Luisa Klotz, first author of the article and principal investigator at the DFG-funded collaborative research centre 128 “Multiple Sclerosis”. Science Translational Medicine doi: 10.1126/ scitranslmed. aao5563.

Munich.  Here SFB researchers from Munich use in vivo calcium imaging in a multiple sclerosis model to show that cytoplasmic calcium levels determine the choice between axon loss and survival. Calcium can enter the axon through nanoscale ruptures of the axonal plasma membrane that are induced in inflammatory lesions. Neuron doi: 10.1016/ j.neuron.2018.12.023

News

Tue, 08/09/2020
Study with identical twins shows that the early form of multiple sclerosis has a specific pattern
The tremendous heterogeneity of the human population presents a major obstacle in understanding how autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute to variations in human peripheral immune signatures. To minimize heterogeneity, SFB researchers from Munich and Muenster made use of a unique cohort of 43 monozygotic twin pairs clinically discordant for MS and searched for […]...more
Mon, 09/03/2020
Breakthrough: SFB scientsists explain pathomechanism of Susac Syndrome
Münster. Neuroinflammation is often associated with blood-brain-barrier dysfunction, which contributes to neurological tissue damage. In a paper published in the renowned journal Nature Communications SFB 128 scientists from Mueenster reveal the pathophysiology of Susac syndrome (SuS), an enigmatic neuroinflammatory disease with central nervous system (CNS) endotheliopathy. By investigating immune cells from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, […]...more
Wed, 04/03/2020
The brain is less immune-priviledged than we thought
Münster. Although the CNS is immune privileged, continuous search for pathogens and tumours by immune cells within the CNS is indispensable. Thus, distinct immune-cell populations also cross the blood–brain barrier independently of inflammation/under homeostatic conditions. It was previously shown that effector memory T cells populate healthy CNS parenchyma in humans and, independently, that CCR5-expressing lymphocytes […]...more