Who we are

Across all four sites, our leading neurologists have a neuroimmunological focus and are embedded in strong neuroscientific and immunological communities.  In addition, each site makes its own specific contributions to the initiative.  Leading the research at each of these sites are:

  • Rhine-Main Neuroscience Network: Stefan Bittner, Tobias Bopp, Sergiu Groppa, Helmut Jonuleit, Jonathan Kipnis, Detlef Schuppan,  Albrecht Stroh, Jacky Trotter, Ari Waisman, Nina Wettschureck and Frauke Zipp
  • Munich neuroimmunologists: Klaus Dornmair, Bernhard Hemmer, Reinhard Hohlfeld, Naoto Kawakami, Martin Kerschensteiner, Thomas Korn , Gurumoorthy Krishnamoorthy, Klaus Lehmann-Horn, Edgar Meinl and Mikael Simons
  • Münster Center: Thomas Budde, Catharina Groß, Luisa Klotz, Tanja Kuhlmann, Karin Loser, Sven Meuth, Hans-Christian Pape, Michael Schäfers, Nicholas Schwab, Lydia Sorokin, Heinz Wiendl and Alexander Zarbock
  • Bochum Center: Ralf Gold and Aiden Haghikia

Furthermore, there are three scientists associated to the network:

  • Associates: Gerd Meyer zu Hörste (Münster), Muthuraman Muthuraman (Rhine-Main Neuroscience Network), Anneli Peters (Munich)

News

Tue, 06/10/2020
Dr. Beatrice Wasser awarded DGfI Herbert Fischer Prize for Neuroimmunology
Each year, the German Society for Immunology (DGfI) recognizes young scientists who have made an outstanding contribution in the field of immunology. This year, Dr. Beatrice Wasser, a Postdoc in the group of Prof. Frauke Zipp and Prof. Stefan Bittner in the Department of Neurology, was award the Herbert Fischer Prize for Neuroimmunology for her […]...more
Tue, 08/09/2020
Study with identical twins shows that the early form of multiple sclerosis has a specific pattern
The tremendous heterogeneity of the human population presents a major obstacle in understanding how autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute to variations in human peripheral immune signatures. To minimize heterogeneity, SFB researchers from Munich and Muenster made use of a unique cohort of 43 monozygotic twin pairs clinically discordant for MS and searched for […]...more
Mon, 09/03/2020
Breakthrough: SFB scientsists explain pathomechanism of Susac Syndrome
Münster. Neuroinflammation is often associated with blood-brain-barrier dysfunction, which contributes to neurological tissue damage. In a paper published in the renowned journal Nature Communications SFB 128 scientists from Mueenster reveal the pathophysiology of Susac syndrome (SuS), an enigmatic neuroinflammatory disease with central nervous system (CNS) endotheliopathy. By investigating immune cells from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, […]...more