Who we are

Across all four sites, our leading neurologists have a neuroimmunological focus and are embedded in strong neuroscientific and immunological communities.  In addition, each site makes its own specific contributions to the initiative.  Leading the research at each of these sites are:

  • Rhine-Main Neuroscience Network: Stefan Bittner, Tobias Bopp, Sergiu Groppa, Helmut Jonuleit, Jonathan Kipnis, Detlef Schuppan,  Albrecht Stroh, Jacky Trotter, Ari Waisman, Nina Wettschureck and Frauke Zipp
  • Munich neuroimmunologists: Klaus Dornmair, Bernhard Hemmer, Reinhard Hohlfeld, Naoto Kawakami, Martin Kerschensteiner, Thomas Korn , Gurumoorthy Krishnamoorthy, Klaus Lehmann-Horn, Edgar Meinl and Mikael Simons
  • Münster Center: Thomas Budde, Catharina Groß, Luisa Klotz, Tanja Kuhlmann, Karin Loser, Sven Meuth, Hans-Christian Pape, Michael Schäfers, Nicholas Schwab, Lydia Sorokin, Heinz Wiendl and Alexander Zarbock
  • Bochum Center: Ralf Gold and Aiden Haghikia

Furthermore, there are three scientists associated to the network:

  • Associates: Gerd Meyer zu Hörste (Münster), Muthuraman Muthuraman (Rhine-Main Neuroscience Network), Anneli Peters (Munich)

News

Thu, 29/08/2019
Symposium: Multiple Sclerosis: balancing effector and regenerative pathways
The International Symposium of the Collaborative Research Centre 128 “Multiple Sclerosis” will take place from 08:30 on Monday 16th until 14:00 on Tuesday 17th September, 2019 at the University Medical Center in Mainz and will end with a general assembly for SFB members. A full program for the meeting can be found here....more
Mon, 03/06/2019
Publication: Teriflunomide treatment for multiple sclerosis modulates T cell mitochondrial respiration with affinity-dependent effects.
Muenster. For the first time scientists from the University of Münster could show that multiple sclerosis (MS) alters the energy metabolism of T cells during acute phases of disease exacerbation. Therapeutic interventions targeting the metabolism of activated T cells display new potential avenues for treatment of patients with MS affecting around 250,000 people in Germany. The […]...more
Mon, 29/04/2019
Publication: Calcium influx through plasma-membrane nanoruptures drives axon degeneration in a model of multiple sclerosis.
Munich.  Here SFB researchers from Munich use in vivo calcium imaging in a multiple sclerosis model to show that cytoplasmic calcium levels determine the choice between axon loss and survival. Calcium can enter the axon through nanoscale ruptures of the axonal plasma membrane that are induced in inflammatory lesions. Neuron doi: 10.1016/ j.neuron.2018.12.023...more