MOG Antibody-Induced CNS Demyelination: from Specificity to Function

A11

IgG antibodies (Abs) specific for central nervous system (CNS) antigens such as myelin oligoden-drocytes glycoprotein (MOG) are considered crucial effector molecules in some patients with mul-tiple sclerosis (MS) and related diseases. In the proposed project, we will characterize structural requirements for immune recognition of human MOG and determine IgG-Fc biophysical profiles and effector functions linked to in vivo pathogenicity of human MOG-Abs. In detail, these are our reseach questions:

    1. Do patients with circulating MOG-specific B cells particularly benefit from B cell depletion therapy?
    2. What are the structural requirements for immune recognition of human MOG?
    3. What are the Fc biophysical profiles and effector functions of human MOG-Abs?
    4. How do human MOG-Abs act pathogenetic in vivo?


Meyer et al. J. Immunol. 2013
Principal Investigators:

Prof. Dr. med. Edgard Meinl
Institut für Klinische Neuroimmunologie
LMU München
edgar.meinl@med.uni-muenchen.de

Univ.-Prof. Dr. med. Jan Lünemann
Klinik für Neurologie mit Institut für Translationale Neurologie
Münster
jan.luenemann@ukmuenster.de

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