News

Wed, 19/01/2022
One drug – different effects: Metabolism of immune cells influences mode of action and could be an indicator for side effects
Muenster – One person can eat large amounts of pasta and still be a small dress size while another looks at a piece of chocolate and puts on weight: metabolism varies between individuals – and this goes beyond a subjective feeling. What is apparent in the overall organism also applies to each cell: the metabolism […]...more
Tue, 14/12/2021
Save the date: 2nd Inflammation & Imaging Symposium
Münster. Save the date: 12-14 September 2022! We cordially invite you to join this international symposium, jointly organized by the research networks CRC 1450, CRC 1009, CRC 1348, CRU 342, CRC/TR 128 and the Cells in Motion Interfaculty Centre at the University of Münster. At the same time, we will officially open the new research […]...more
Mon, 09/08/2021
Dietary conjugated linoleic acid links reduced intestinal inflammation to amelioration of CNS autoimmunity
A close interaction between gut immune responses and distant organ-specific autoimmunity including the CNS in multiple sclerosis has been established in recent years. This so-called gut-CNS axis can be shaped by dietary factors, either directly or via indirect modulation of the gut microbiome and its metabolites. Here, SFB 128 PI Luisa Klotz and colleagues report […]...more


Wed, 23/11/2016 | Featured publication: Imaging matrix metalloproteinase activity in multiple sclerosis as a specific marker of leukocyte penetration of the blood-brain barrier

Münster – The enzymes gelatinase A/matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and gelatinase B/MMP-9 are essential for induction of neuroinflammatory symptoms in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). In the absence of these enzymes, the disease does not develop. SFB128 scientists of Prof. Dr. Lydia Sorokin’s group, therefore, investigated the cellular sources and relative contributions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 to disease at early stages of EAE induction. They demonstrated that MMP-9 from an immune cell source is required in EAE for initial infiltration of leukocytes into the central nervous system and that MMP-9 activity is a reliable marker of leukocyte penetration of the blood-brain barrier.
The neuroscientists then developed a molecular imaging method to visualize MMP activity in the brain using fluorescent- and radioactive-labeled MMP inhibitors (MMPis).
By using radioactive MMP ligand in EAE animals the Muenster neuroscientists produced positron emission tomography (PET) images of MMP activity in patients with MS.
In contrast to traditional T1-gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, MMPi-PET enabled tracking of MMP activity as a unique feature of early lesions and ongoing leukocyte infiltration.
MMPi-PET therefore allows monitoring of the early steps of MS development and provides sensitive, noninvasive means of following lesion formation and resolution in murine EAE and human MS, the neuroscientists conclude. Their work was part of the SFB projects B03 and Z02.