Muenster. For the first time scientists from the University of Münster could show that multiple sclerosis (MS) alters the energy metabolism of T cells during acute phases of disease exacerbation. Therapeutic interventions targeting the metabolism of activated T cells display new potential avenues for treatment of patients with MS affecting around 250,000 people in Germany. The results of the study have recently been published in the renowned journal Science Translational Medicine. In a clinical trial, the authors investigated the effects of the MS drug teriflunomide in patients and analyzed its effects on immune cells. They could reveal that the drug specifically interferes with the energy metabolism of T cells and thereby preferentially affects highly active immune cells. “The drug specifically interferes with the activation of these cells already in the early initiation phase”, explains Luisa Klotz, first author of the article and principal investigator at the DFG-funded collaborative research centre 128 “Multiple Sclerosis”. Science Translational Medicine doi: 10.1126/ scitranslmed. aao5563.

Munich.  Here SFB researchers from Munich use in vivo calcium imaging in a multiple sclerosis model to show that cytoplasmic calcium levels determine the choice between axon loss and survival. Calcium can enter the axon through nanoscale ruptures of the axonal plasma membrane that are induced in inflammatory lesions. Neuron doi: 10.1016/ j.neuron.2018.12.023

News

Wed, 19/01/2022
One drug – different effects: Metabolism of immune cells influences mode of action and could be an indicator for side effects
Muenster – One person can eat large amounts of pasta and still be a small dress size while another looks at a piece of chocolate and puts on weight: metabolism varies between individuals – and this goes beyond a subjective feeling. What is apparent in the overall organism also applies to each cell: the metabolism […]...more
Tue, 14/12/2021
Save the date: 2nd Inflammation & Imaging Symposium
Münster. Save the date: 12-14 September 2022! We cordially invite you to join this international symposium, jointly organized by the research networks CRC 1450, CRC 1009, CRC 1348, CRU 342, CRC/TR 128 and the Cells in Motion Interfaculty Centre at the University of Münster. At the same time, we will officially open the new research […]...more
Mon, 09/08/2021
Dietary conjugated linoleic acid links reduced intestinal inflammation to amelioration of CNS autoimmunity
A close interaction between gut immune responses and distant organ-specific autoimmunity including the CNS in multiple sclerosis has been established in recent years. This so-called gut-CNS axis can be shaped by dietary factors, either directly or via indirect modulation of the gut microbiome and its metabolites. Here, SFB 128 PI Luisa Klotz and colleagues report […]...more