News

Fri, 25/05/2018
SFB/CRC-TR 128 retreat in Munich
Munich. The CRC-TR 128 “Multiple Sclerosis” corsially invites all its members – principal investigators as well as associated scientists and young investigators – to meet for a general scientific update, discussion and exchange at this year’s retreat. In addition to the PI meeting there will be a one-day conference especially for young investigators. When?: Thursday […]...more
Tue, 10/04/2018
Lecture: Environmental influence on the immune system
Mainz. The Research Center for Immunotherapy (FZI) and CRC 1292 are happy to welcome SFB 128 PI Prof. Karin Loser, MD, as a guest lecturer at their immunological seminar. Prof. Loser will talk about “Control of Immune responses by the environment”. When?: Thursday, April 26, 5:00 PM Where? University Medical Center Mainz, building 708, seminar […]...more
Fri, 16/03/2018
Lecture on Cell Interactions at the Blood-Brain-barrier
Muenster. The DFG-funded Comprehensive Research Centre “Breaking Barriers” cordially invites everyone interested in neuroimmunology to its upcoming Jour-Fixe Meeting where Luisa Klotz and Heinz Wiendl – both acting as PIs in the DFG-funded CRC “Multiple Sclerosis” (128) as well as “Breaking Barriers” (1009) – will hold a lecture on “Immune Cell Interactions with Endothelial Cells […]...more


Wed, 23/11/2016 | Featured publication: Imaging matrix metalloproteinase activity in multiple sclerosis as a specific marker of leukocyte penetration of the blood-brain barrier

Münster – The enzymes gelatinase A/matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and gelatinase B/MMP-9 are essential for induction of neuroinflammatory symptoms in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). In the absence of these enzymes, the disease does not develop. SFB128 scientists of Prof. Dr. Lydia Sorokin’s group, therefore, investigated the cellular sources and relative contributions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 to disease at early stages of EAE induction. They demonstrated that MMP-9 from an immune cell source is required in EAE for initial infiltration of leukocytes into the central nervous system and that MMP-9 activity is a reliable marker of leukocyte penetration of the blood-brain barrier.
The neuroscientists then developed a molecular imaging method to visualize MMP activity in the brain using fluorescent- and radioactive-labeled MMP inhibitors (MMPis).
By using radioactive MMP ligand in EAE animals the Muenster neuroscientists produced positron emission tomography (PET) images of MMP activity in patients with MS.
In contrast to traditional T1-gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, MMPi-PET enabled tracking of MMP activity as a unique feature of early lesions and ongoing leukocyte infiltration.
MMPi-PET therefore allows monitoring of the early steps of MS development and provides sensitive, noninvasive means of following lesion formation and resolution in murine EAE and human MS, the neuroscientists conclude. Their work was part of the SFB projects B03 and Z02.