News

Mon, 27/01/2020
Featured Publication: Integrated single cell analysis of blood and cerebrospinal fluid leukocytes in multiple sclerosis
Münster. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protects the central nervous system (CNS) and analyzing CSF aids the diagnosis of CNS diseases, but our understanding of CSF leukocytes remains superficial. Here, using single cell transcriptomics, SFB researchers identify a specific border-associated composition and transcriptome of CSF leukocytes. In an article published in Nature Communications, they show that multiple […]...more
Tue, 14/01/2020
Immunology-Seminar: Prof. Dr. Britta Engelhardt: The brain barriers maintain CNS immune privilege
Mainz. The SFB 128 is happy welcome Prof. Dr. Britta Engelhardt from Theo Kocher Institute Bern as lecturer at the Mainz Immunology Seminar. Time: Thursday, January 30, 5:00 p.m. Place: Building 308 A, Room 3.105, 3rd floor, University Medical Center Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz...more
Tue, 22/10/2019
The key lies in cell metabolism: Neuroscientist and neurologist Luisa Klotz wins renowned Heinrich-Pette-Award
Münster. For the third time the renowned neuroscience award “Heinrich Pette prize” goes to Münster, as this year Luisa Klotz was rewarded with the prestigious award for neuroscience researchers and clinicians at the congress of the German Society of Neurology in Stuttgart. Neurologist and Neuroscientist Luisa Klotz received the award for her outstanding research in […]...more


Wed, 23/11/2016 | Featured publication: Imaging matrix metalloproteinase activity in multiple sclerosis as a specific marker of leukocyte penetration of the blood-brain barrier

Münster – The enzymes gelatinase A/matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and gelatinase B/MMP-9 are essential for induction of neuroinflammatory symptoms in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). In the absence of these enzymes, the disease does not develop. SFB128 scientists of Prof. Dr. Lydia Sorokin’s group, therefore, investigated the cellular sources and relative contributions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 to disease at early stages of EAE induction. They demonstrated that MMP-9 from an immune cell source is required in EAE for initial infiltration of leukocytes into the central nervous system and that MMP-9 activity is a reliable marker of leukocyte penetration of the blood-brain barrier.
The neuroscientists then developed a molecular imaging method to visualize MMP activity in the brain using fluorescent- and radioactive-labeled MMP inhibitors (MMPis).
By using radioactive MMP ligand in EAE animals the Muenster neuroscientists produced positron emission tomography (PET) images of MMP activity in patients with MS.
In contrast to traditional T1-gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, MMPi-PET enabled tracking of MMP activity as a unique feature of early lesions and ongoing leukocyte infiltration.
MMPi-PET therefore allows monitoring of the early steps of MS development and provides sensitive, noninvasive means of following lesion formation and resolution in murine EAE and human MS, the neuroscientists conclude. Their work was part of the SFB projects B03 and Z02.