News

Tue, 04/12/2018
SFB 128 International Symposium
SFB 128. We are happy to announce the international Symposium of the Collaborative Research Centre 128 “Multiple Sclerosis” taking place from Sunday, September 15th, till Tuesday, September 17th, 2019 in the Rhine Main region. Full details of the event will follow....more
Fri, 26/10/2018
Featured publication: Low-Frequency and Rare-Coding Variation Contributes to Multiple Sclerosis Risk
In a large multi-cohort study, performed by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium (IMSGC) and published in Cell Magazine, unexplained heritability for multiple sclerosis (MS) is detected in low-frequency coding variants that are missed by genome-wide association study (GWAS) analyses, further underscoring the role of immune genes in MS pathology. The IMSGC was formed in […]...more
Tue, 09/10/2018
Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy) will be funded
Munich. The Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy) by LMU and TUM will receive funding from 2019 on. Currently SFB PIs Prof. Reinhard Hohlfeld, Prof. Martin Kerschensteiner, Prof. Mikael Simons are also PIs of SyNergy projects....more


Wed, 23/11/2016 | Featured publication: Imaging matrix metalloproteinase activity in multiple sclerosis as a specific marker of leukocyte penetration of the blood-brain barrier

Münster – The enzymes gelatinase A/matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and gelatinase B/MMP-9 are essential for induction of neuroinflammatory symptoms in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). In the absence of these enzymes, the disease does not develop. SFB128 scientists of Prof. Dr. Lydia Sorokin’s group, therefore, investigated the cellular sources and relative contributions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 to disease at early stages of EAE induction. They demonstrated that MMP-9 from an immune cell source is required in EAE for initial infiltration of leukocytes into the central nervous system and that MMP-9 activity is a reliable marker of leukocyte penetration of the blood-brain barrier.
The neuroscientists then developed a molecular imaging method to visualize MMP activity in the brain using fluorescent- and radioactive-labeled MMP inhibitors (MMPis).
By using radioactive MMP ligand in EAE animals the Muenster neuroscientists produced positron emission tomography (PET) images of MMP activity in patients with MS.
In contrast to traditional T1-gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, MMPi-PET enabled tracking of MMP activity as a unique feature of early lesions and ongoing leukocyte infiltration.
MMPi-PET therefore allows monitoring of the early steps of MS development and provides sensitive, noninvasive means of following lesion formation and resolution in murine EAE and human MS, the neuroscientists conclude. Their work was part of the SFB projects B03 and Z02.