News

Wed, 04/03/2020
The brain is less immune-priviledged than we thought
Münster. Although the CNS is immune privileged, continuous search for pathogens and tumours by immune cells within the CNS is indispensable. Thus, distinct immune-cell populations also cross the blood–brain barrier independently of inflammation/under homeostatic conditions. It was previously shown that effector memory T cells populate healthy CNS parenchyma in humans and, independently, that CCR5-expressing lymphocytes […]...more
Mon, 27/01/2020
Featured Publication: Integrated single cell analysis of blood and cerebrospinal fluid leukocytes in multiple sclerosis
Münster. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protects the central nervous system (CNS) and analyzing CSF aids the diagnosis of CNS diseases, but our understanding of CSF leukocytes remains superficial. Here, using single cell transcriptomics, SFB researchers identify a specific border-associated composition and transcriptome of CSF leukocytes. In an article published in Nature Communications, they show that multiple […]...more
Tue, 22/10/2019
The key lies in cell metabolism: Neuroscientist and neurologist Luisa Klotz wins renowned Heinrich-Pette-Award
Münster. For the third time the renowned neuroscience award “Heinrich Pette prize” goes to Münster, as this year Luisa Klotz was rewarded with the prestigious award for neuroscience researchers and clinicians at the congress of the German Society of Neurology in Stuttgart. Neurologist and Neuroscientist Luisa Klotz received the award for her outstanding research in […]...more


Tue, 25/10/2016 | Milestone in MS research: neuroimmunologists find cause of deficit in body’s own immune system

Within a project of the SFB 128, scientists from the universities in Münster and Munich have discovered what precisely goes wrong in the body in the case of multiple sclerosis (MS). At the same time the neuroscientists were able to demonstrate that for MS, which occurs in bouts, there is a therapy which is tailor-made to eliminate the deficit. More Information . . .