News

Tue, 04/12/2018
SFB 128 International Symposium
SFB 128. We are happy to announce the international Symposium of the Collaborative Research Centre 128 “Multiple Sclerosis” taking place from Sunday, September 15th, till Tuesday, September 17th, 2019 in the Rhine Main region. Full details of the event will follow....more
Fri, 26/10/2018
Featured publication: Low-Frequency and Rare-Coding Variation Contributes to Multiple Sclerosis Risk
In a large multi-cohort study, performed by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium (IMSGC) and published in Cell Magazine, unexplained heritability for multiple sclerosis (MS) is detected in low-frequency coding variants that are missed by genome-wide association study (GWAS) analyses, further underscoring the role of immune genes in MS pathology. The IMSGC was formed in […]...more
Tue, 09/10/2018
Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy) will be funded
Munich. The Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy) by LMU and TUM will receive funding from 2019 on. Currently SFB PIs Prof. Reinhard Hohlfeld, Prof. Martin Kerschensteiner, Prof. Mikael Simons are also PIs of SyNergy projects....more


Fri, 26/10/2018 | Featured publication: Low-Frequency and Rare-Coding Variation Contributes to Multiple Sclerosis Risk

In a large multi-cohort study, performed by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium (IMSGC) and published in Cell Magazine, unexplained heritability for multiple sclerosis (MS) is detected in low-frequency coding variants that are missed by genome-wide association study (GWAS) analyses, further underscoring the role of immune genes in MS pathology. The IMSGC was formed in 2003 with funding from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and published results from the first GWAS in 2007 that identified the second and third susceptibility genes known to predispose people to developing MS. IMSGC later expanded to include more research groups from more countries, receiving grants to conduct larger GWAS studies. IMSGC brings together researchers from 15 different countries, among them scientists from the SFB-CRC 128 member organizations Technische Universität München and Universitätsmedizin Mainz. A pdf of the article may be found here (restricted access)