News

Fri, 01/02/2019
Young Investigator retreat
SFB 128.  This year’s Young Investigator retreat will be on May 9 and 10 at Kloster Wasem (Ingelheim). The organizers and YI representatives kindly asks everyone who has not yet done so to give a quick feedback about his or her participation by email to Manuela.cerina@ukmuenster.de. More information about the event as well as a […]...more
Tue, 04/12/2018
SFB 128 International Symposium
SFB 128. We are happy to announce the international Symposium of the Collaborative Research Centre 128 “Multiple Sclerosis” taking place from Sunday, September 15th, till Tuesday, September 17th, 2019 in the Rhine Main region. Full details of the event will follow....more
Fri, 26/10/2018
Featured publication: Low-Frequency and Rare-Coding Variation Contributes to Multiple Sclerosis Risk
In a large multi-cohort study, performed by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium (IMSGC) and published in Cell Magazine, unexplained heritability for multiple sclerosis (MS) is detected in low-frequency coding variants that are missed by genome-wide association study (GWAS) analyses, further underscoring the role of immune genes in MS pathology. The IMSGC was formed in […]...more


Mon, 21/11/2016 | Research into “accident black spots“: new hypothesis on the origins of centres of inflammation in multiple sclerosis

Münster (mfm/sk-sm) – The scenario resembles a serious motor accident: a car has spun out of control, breaches the central crash barrier and collides with the oncoming traffic. In the case of multiple sclerosis, harmful T-cells break through the protective blood-brain barrier and thus penetrate into the central nervous system (CNS), where they trigger a destructive inflammation. What’s special about this is that evidently the CNS also has “accident black spots” – in other words, places where an especially high number of centres of inflammation are be found. Neuro-immunologists at Münster University have now found out why this is so. More . . .

PD Dr. Luisa Klotz and Ivan Kuzmanov at work in the laboratory (Photo: FZ/UKM)

PD Dr. Luisa Klotz and Ivan Kuzmanov at work in the laboratory (Photo: FZ/UKM)