News

Tue, 06/10/2020
Dr. Beatrice Wasser awarded DGfI Herbert Fischer Prize for Neuroimmunology
Each year, the German Society for Immunology (DGfI) recognizes young scientists who have made an outstanding contribution in the field of immunology. This year, Dr. Beatrice Wasser, a Postdoc in the group of Prof. Frauke Zipp and Prof. Stefan Bittner in the Department of Neurology, was award the Herbert Fischer Prize for Neuroimmunology for her […]...more
Tue, 08/09/2020
Study with identical twins shows that the early form of multiple sclerosis has a specific pattern
The tremendous heterogeneity of the human population presents a major obstacle in understanding how autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute to variations in human peripheral immune signatures. To minimize heterogeneity, SFB researchers from Munich and Muenster made use of a unique cohort of 43 monozygotic twin pairs clinically discordant for MS and searched for […]...more
Mon, 09/03/2020
Breakthrough: SFB scientsists explain pathomechanism of Susac Syndrome
Münster. Neuroinflammation is often associated with blood-brain-barrier dysfunction, which contributes to neurological tissue damage. In a paper published in the renowned journal Nature Communications SFB 128 scientists from Mueenster reveal the pathophysiology of Susac syndrome (SuS), an enigmatic neuroinflammatory disease with central nervous system (CNS) endotheliopathy. By investigating immune cells from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, […]...more


Wed, 04/03/2020 | The brain is less immune-priviledged than we thought

Münster. Although the CNS is immune privileged, continuous search for pathogens and tumours by immune cells within the CNS is indispensable. Thus, distinct immune-cell populations also cross the blood–brain barrier independently of inflammation/under homeostatic conditions. It was previously shown that effector memory T cells populate healthy CNS parenchyma in humans and, independently, that CCR5-expressing lymphocytes as well as CCR5 ligands are enriched in the CNS of patients with multiple sclerosis. Apart from the recently described CD8+ CNS tissue-resident memory T cells, CRC researchers from Muenster identified a population of CD4+CCR5high effector memory cells as brain parenchyma-surveilling cells. In an interview with the German radio news channel NDR info they explain these latest insights. Listen to the radio report (in German):

Adapted from: Herich S, Schneider-Hohendorf T, Rohlmann A, Khaleghi Ghadiri M, Schulte-Mecklenbeck A, Zondler L, Janoschka C, Ostkamp P, Richter J, Breuer J, Dimitrov S, Rammensee HG, Grauer OM, Klotz L, Gross CC, Stummer W, Missler M, Zarbock A, Vestweber D, Wiendl H, Schwab N. Human CCR5high effector memory cells perform CNS parenchymal immune surveillance via GZMK-mediated transendothelial diapedesis. Brain.142(11):3411-3427.