News

Mon, 20/09/2021
Register now: 1st Symposium inflammation and imaging
When?: from November 2nd to November 4th 2021 Where?: Schloss (seat of the University Administration) Muenster Organizers: Co-operative Research Centres 1009, 1450, Transregio 128, and Clinical Research Unit 342 – together with Interdisciplinary Centre of Clinical Research (IZKF) and Excellence Cluster Cells in Motion (CiM) Registration is open now! More information: here...more
Mon, 09/08/2021
Dietary conjugated linoleic acid links reduced intestinal inflammation to amelioration of CNS autoimmunity
A close interaction between gut immune responses and distant organ-specific autoimmunity including the CNS in multiple sclerosis has been established in recent years. This so-called gut-CNS axis can be shaped by dietary factors, either directly or via indirect modulation of the gut microbiome and its metabolites. Here, SFB 128 PI Luisa Klotz and colleagues report […]...more
Thu, 28/01/2021
BioNTech Publishes Data on Novel mRNA Vaccine Approach to Treat Autoimmune Diseases in Science
BioNTech SE (Nasdaq: BNTX, “BioNTech” or “the Company”) announced the publication of preclinical data on its novel mRNA vaccine approach against autoimmune diseases in the peer-reviewed journal Science. The publication titled “A non-inflammatory mRNA vaccine for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis” co-authored by SFB principal investigator Ari Waisman summarizes the findings on the disease-suppressing effects […]...more


Wed, 04/03/2020 | The brain is less immune-priviledged than we thought

Münster. Although the CNS is immune privileged, continuous search for pathogens and tumours by immune cells within the CNS is indispensable. Thus, distinct immune-cell populations also cross the blood–brain barrier independently of inflammation/under homeostatic conditions. It was previously shown that effector memory T cells populate healthy CNS parenchyma in humans and, independently, that CCR5-expressing lymphocytes as well as CCR5 ligands are enriched in the CNS of patients with multiple sclerosis. Apart from the recently described CD8+ CNS tissue-resident memory T cells, CRC researchers from Muenster identified a population of CD4+CCR5high effector memory cells as brain parenchyma-surveilling cells. In an interview with the German radio news channel NDR info they explain these latest insights. Listen to the radio report (in German):

Adapted from: Herich S, Schneider-Hohendorf T, Rohlmann A, Khaleghi Ghadiri M, Schulte-Mecklenbeck A, Zondler L, Janoschka C, Ostkamp P, Richter J, Breuer J, Dimitrov S, Rammensee HG, Grauer OM, Klotz L, Gross CC, Stummer W, Missler M, Zarbock A, Vestweber D, Wiendl H, Schwab N. Human CCR5high effector memory cells perform CNS parenchymal immune surveillance via GZMK-mediated transendothelial diapedesis. Brain.142(11):3411-3427.