News

Mon, 20/09/2021
Register now: 1st Symposium inflammation and imaging
When?: from November 2nd to November 4th 2021 Where?: Schloss (seat of the University Administration) Muenster Organizers: Co-operative Research Centres 1009, 1450, Transregio 128, and Clinical Research Unit 342 – together with Interdisciplinary Centre of Clinical Research (IZKF) and Excellence Cluster Cells in Motion (CiM) Registration is open now! More information: here...more
Mon, 09/08/2021
Dietary conjugated linoleic acid links reduced intestinal inflammation to amelioration of CNS autoimmunity
A close interaction between gut immune responses and distant organ-specific autoimmunity including the CNS in multiple sclerosis has been established in recent years. This so-called gut-CNS axis can be shaped by dietary factors, either directly or via indirect modulation of the gut microbiome and its metabolites. Here, SFB 128 PI Luisa Klotz and colleagues report […]...more
Thu, 28/01/2021
BioNTech Publishes Data on Novel mRNA Vaccine Approach to Treat Autoimmune Diseases in Science
BioNTech SE (Nasdaq: BNTX, “BioNTech” or “the Company”) announced the publication of preclinical data on its novel mRNA vaccine approach against autoimmune diseases in the peer-reviewed journal Science. The publication titled “A non-inflammatory mRNA vaccine for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis” co-authored by SFB principal investigator Ari Waisman summarizes the findings on the disease-suppressing effects […]...more


Tue, 15/12/2020 | Transregio-Cooperative Research Centre „Multiple Sclerosis“ funded for another four years

The Collaborative Research Center 128 “Multiple Sclerosis” is entering its third round. As the German Research Association announced, the major project with locations in Münster, Mainz and Munich will be supported for a further four years (until mid-2024). Speaker Prof. Heinz Wiendl, Co-Spokesperson Prof. Frauke Zipp (Mainz) and other scientists are researching multiple sclerosis – a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system. Their focus is on the interaction between the immune and nervous systems on a molecular, cellular and systems biological level. The 35 principal investigators and their teams analyse the changes in the immune system underlying the disease, effects the attack of the immune system has on the central nervous system and how these consequences can be modulated with the latest therapies. The 22 individual projects are tackling a wide range of topics, including the role of the intestinal microbiome in inflammation and nerve destruction in MS, the patterns of nerve damage that MS patients e.g. in MRI images show and the effect of various MS drugs on the immune system. In the next four years, the focus of her work will be on coping with illnesses. This means both better control and monitoring of the now widespread drugs for treating MS and translation – i.e. the transfer of research results into patient care and – the other way around – the use of knowledge from clinical practice for work in the laboratory.